Get to know UW-Whitewater fraternities, sororities

Brianna Welbourn and Ricky Conti, both presidents of Greek organizations, answer questions about Greek life on campus.

Delta Zeta Sorority was founded on Oct. 24, 1902 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The UW-Whitewater chapter was created on Sept. 20, 1956. They currently have 107 members.

Delta Chi Fraternity was founded on Oct. 13, 1890 at Cornell University in Ithica, N.Y. The fraternity came to UW-Whitewater in 1968. Their chapter currently has 35 members

Royal Purple: What is your biggest philanthropy event?

Welbourn: In the fall semester, we have a Turtle Race, a 5K Run/Walk. All of the proceeds go toward one of our national philanthropies, the Painted Turtle Camp in Lake Hughes, Calif. The camp is a non-profit organization that invites children who have chronic and terminal illnesses to enjoy a camp experience for a week, completely free. Our other large philanthropy

Welbourn

event we host in the spring, is our Hoops for Hearing. This event raises money for our other national philanthropy, Speech and Hearing.

Conti: We are hosting a water pong tournament April 17 at 6 p.m. in the Williams Center. The cost to enter is $10 per team and everyone is encouraged to join. All of the money raised will be donated to the V Foundation for Cancer Research. We will also be giving away an awesome prize of 40 Toppers pizzas, an $800 value, to the first place team.

RP: What sets your organization apart from others on campus?

Welbourn: I wouldn’t say that anything specific sets us apart from other organizations on campus, but I would say that we do have a deep love for our philanthropies and helping in the community. We also pride ourselves in our academics and as a whole last semester we had a cumulative GPA of a 3.15, which does say a lot about our work ethic.

Conti: Our values make us unique to other organizations on campus. Our members strive to promote lifelong friendships, develop character, advance justice and acquire a sound

Conti

education.

RP: What is the worst Greek stereotype your organization has been accused of?

Welbourn: In the past we have been accused of being fake. Unfortunately, the individuals who did say this must not have met any of us, because we are the most genuine, caring people I have ever met and I am proud to say that none of us are fake.

Conti: I have heard people say that Greeks are “clickish” and don’t interact with students outside the Greek community. However, I believe this is simply a misconception some students may have. Most Greeks are social, friendly, and involved in other organizations outside or their fraternity or sorority.

RP: What is the best part of Greek life?

Welbourn: Our Greek Community does an incredible amount of service and we all stand behind each other to support one another at each other’s philanthropy events.

Conti: The people you meet and the friendships you make.

 

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