Get to know…President Whaley

Most children, at one time or another, dream of being president some day.

For junior Andrew Whaley, an economics major, this dream began when he was in second grade and came true during his third year in college.

Junior Andrew Whaley, president of Whitewater Student Government, has been taking on the responsibilities of president since being elected last spring. by Andrew Smith

Obviously, Whaley, a 2008 graduate of Whitefish Bay High School, is not qualified to be president of the United States.

Nonetheless, becoming president of the student body was never out of the question.

“I was excited [when I was elected] because I doubted that I could pull off winning when I entered the race so late,” Whaley said. “I also felt a little nervous because I knew it was the biggest responsibility I have ever had.”

That big responsibility of being president includes senate sessions each Monday night, meetings with other campus leaders, and meetings with other student body presidents in the UW System. This is all on top of juggling full-time schoolwork, and a girlfriend.

However, just because Whaley is a president doesn’t mean he’s any different than other students when it comes to what he’s interested in.

Some of Whaley’s main hobbies include music and reading.

“I play several instruments, mostly guitar, but my latest musical endeavor is … the banjo,” Whaley said. “I love live music of any kind and I look forward to spending the summer attending various festivals and concerts.”

Some of Whaley’s favorite bands and musicians include The Grateful Dead, The Band, Bob Dylan and Buddy Guy. He said he enjoys reading books about religion, history, philosophy and political theory.

Grilled steak is the president’s favorite food. His favorite color is Irish green and favorite movie is “The Departed.”

If Whaley could pick any job in the world, he said he would want to be a touring musician that plays around the world. In his major, he would like to work internationally, helping communities in other countries start businesses and develop their physical and human capital.

Politics, however, is not exactly in the interest of this president after he graduates.

“I think the only level of politics I would enter after college is serving on a village or town council,” Whaley said. “After college I would like to spend some time traveling and possibly live in another country for a little bit.”

Whaley has yet to decide whether he wants to run for re-election in the upcoming presidential elections.

Whaley said he believes the students at UW-Whitewater have the most opportunity of any to be a leader in the comprehensive universities in the UW System. Although he says he enjoys how fun the students can be, he believes there is one thing they need to improve on.

“I do wish that students would be more willing to participate in the governance structure on any level here on campus,” Whaley said. “There [is] more pressure to make sure their tuition and fees are well spent.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email