Nanoscience Symposium looks to prepare next generation of scientists

Nanoscience is the study of atoms, molecules and objects whose sizes are on the nanometer scale.

Exactly what this is and how it works can be learned at the Nanoscience Symposium taking place from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Oct. 12th in Upham Hall. This year’s event, which is open to anyone, is themed “Educating tomorrow’s workforce.”

Brown

Eric Brown, assistant professor of biological sciences, helped organize the event.

“We’re focusing on education in nanotechnology and how we’re preparing the next generation of scientist to fill those jobs appearing in the next five years or so in the field of nanotechnology,” Brown said.

UW-Whitewater has held the annual Nanoscience Symposium for three years.

This year, the keynote speaker for the event will be John Kirk, an associate professor of chemistry and nanoscience at UW-Stout.

“I’m honored to be the keynote speaker, and I’m really looking forward to sharing what I’ve learned and researched,” Kirk said.

His research has been on video games and education, particularly how it applies to nanoscience.

During this symposium, the physics, biology and chemistry departments will hold workshops to help educate the participants and give the experience of working with nanoscience in each area.

Kirk

Jessica Menke, assistant professor of chemistry, will also help with the symposium.

“I think it’s great that we have over 130 people signed up [to attend] so far and have a lot of people from different areas,” Menke said. “This will give them exposure to nanoscience.”

John Frost, a representative from the company picoSpin, will also be on hand, educating participants about nanoscience.

PicoSpin is the manufacturer of the world’s only commercially-available, high-performance miniature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer used to exploit the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei.

Physics Professor Jalal Nawash is also participating in the symposium.

“The purpose of the nanoscience symposium is to raise awareness of nanoscience, and I believe students recognize the importance more due to the symposium,” Nawash said.

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