Revolution: to be, or not to be?

First, let me begin by saying I love America and all of the freedoms that come along with being born in it.  Though I, as do many, see issues in need of correction.

Take Scott Walker for instance, a man the people of Wisconsin voted into office, a man now trying to balance a budget with a $3.6 billion deficit by setting pension percentages higher for state and public employees.

Assistant Photo Editor Andrew Smith

The same man is trying to strip unions of certain bargaining powers, putting the proletariat, or working class, lower  not only on the economic scale but, the power hierarchy.

This move will separate the Elite from lower and middle class laborers.

The separation of the “have” and “have nots” will breed jealousy, envy and discontent among the working class, but may also result in disparity among the working class citizen.

Say what? You don’t believe there is an elite class in America?  Well then, just have yourself a gander at the

Bilderberg Club, elitism at its finest.  The group consists of about 150 influential people in politics, business, banking, the military, media and so on. Meetings are held at disclosed locations to speak of undisclosed subject matter.

This is representative of the elite gathering to run the country or an attempt to control the majority.

The elite class is far separate from the working class who work day in and day out to earn nothing more than what the elite think is a living wage.

With the unemployment rate in Wisconsin at 9.4 percent, making roughly 227,678 people unemployed, we, the people of Wisconsin, are fortunate to even have a job paying minimum wage.

As class separation continues to grow, the rich will stay rich and the proletariat will become increasingly desperate for relief.

This desperation could fuel the flame that is, or will become, a second American revolution.  A second revolution will be fueled just like any other, through inequalities and overtaxation.

Stepping back and looking at who has the power in our country, you can see it is the elite; this power causes the inequalities in power, control and wealth.

The elite use this power to benefit themselves and their contributors.

We think of ourselves as so evolved yet we are no better than French feudalists prior to the revolution of 1789, who had nobility and clergy.  They paid no taxes, only collected.

This inequality in feudal France helped to fuel the French Revolution.

A similar inequality, overtaxation, and under-representation caused the American Revolution against Great Britain in 1776.

Today, we find a similar situation in which the rich are taxed less and the poor are taxed more.

The New York Times reports the Internal Revenue Service can accurately tax about 99 percent of wage income whereas it can only tax about 70 percent of income from business and investments (what the rich are mostly involved in.)

Revolutions are caused by inequality, separation between the elite and the laboring class, and people reaching a point of utter desperation.

Financial inequality is greatly present in America.

It’s only a matter of time before the working class will reach a point of disparity that will leave us to seek no other alternative.

Eventually, we will have to take back the government and central banking system in an attempt to redistribute the wealth.

It’s too bad the majority of the youth find themselves mesmerized by media, slaves to the American dollar, and too self-centered to think about the common good.

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