Healthy choices deserve support

According to the American Heart Association, 149.3 million Americans over the age of 20 were overweight or obese in 2012.

With statistics like that, it comes as no surprise that more fad diet plans and exercise programs have popped up in recent years.

People are exchanging carbohydrates for “super fruits” and spending upwards of $100 for DVD exercise programs, hoping these changes will help them achieve a healthy weight.

Even though it may be difficult for some to understand why people subscribe to seemingly crazy or over-the-top diet and exercise programs, students should support each other in healthy lifestyle decisions.

Exercise and a healthy diet are two key players in leading a healthy life. By working out and eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains and proteins, someone could see positive changes such as weight loss and lower blood pressure.

Diet and exercise programs are typically designed to combine a variety of workout techniques with a very specific meal plan to help users lose weight and gain muscle in a healthy way.

Some exercise systems and diet plans get a bad reputation for being ineffective or a waste of money even though they may work well for some people.

If followed correctly, one person may achieve great results from a program someone else deems useless.

Something people should keep in mind before judging someone for the diet or exercise regimen they follow is this: One specific program doesn’t always work for everyone.

Each person has different needs and abilities, so a diet that works well for one person might not work for someone else at all.

Because of this, students should not automatically jump to the conclusion that someone else is following a useless diet or exercise plan.

If one person wants to try the P90X fitness program or the Paleo diet and they are getting healthy results, the only thing that should matter is that they are getting them in a healthier way that works for them.

At the same time, people who have had success with one particular exercise plan or diet program should not try to force it on others.

Not only might the plan that worked for them not work for the friends they try to recruit, but they might end up unnecessarily insulting someone by telling them they have to join the latest diet or exercise craze.

But there is a difference between adopting a healthier lifestyle and creating an eating disorder.

If someone begins exercising more and eating better in a healthy way, they should be supported instead of criticized.

However, people who are concerned that a friend or fellow student is attempting to lose weight in an unhealthy way should rightly try to get them help.

It can be tough to alter an unhealthy lifestyle in favor of a healthier one. Habits such as eating junk food and sitting on the couch instead of being active can be difficult to break, especially in college when many students don’t have the facilities to cook for themselves.

Students who take their health into their own hands by deciding to exercise and eat better do not deserve to be judged any more than students who have not made the same choices do.

If an individual decides to alter their diet or exercise routine to become healthier, other students should support and encourage them instead of judging.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email